Home #newagemusic Album of the Month: 2002 – Celtic Fairy Dream

Album of the Month: 2002 – Celtic Fairy Dream

557

When 2002 released “Celtic Fairy Dream” in April last year, it was as if the album was heaven-sent. It gave comfort to so many 2002 fans throughout the difficult 2020 – and we still need its magic in the new year. “Celtic Fairy Dream” is New Age Music Guide’s Album of the Month for January 2021! 

In my review, I wrote that: “2002 has always been one of the best New Age music bands, but today it is more apparent than ever that Randy and Pamela Copus’ daughter Sarah lifts the band to incredible new heights. Take my word for it: Even Enya would be amazed by “Celtic Fairy Dream”. It has musical magic dust sprinkled all over.”

The album opener is called “Castle of Dromore” – and what a magnificent song it is! Don’t be surprised if you find yourself instantly looking for the replay button; Sarah’s vocal is amazing, reminding of a youthful Enya as heard on the album “The Frog Prince” (1985).

Talking about Enya; Next out is “The Green Fields of Autumn”, which is a traditional song many will remember from Clannad’s album “Magical Ring” (1983), under the name “Coinleach Ghlas An Fhómair”. 2002’s version is much more dreamy, in tune with the album’s overall theme.

Lullaby (Suantrai)
“Lullaby (Suantrai)” is an Irish lullaby about Mary, who sings to her new-born son. Sarah’s vocal fits perfectly, and the voice layering is done with skill and is “just right”. The album is well-produced from start to finish, and 2002 takes no shortcuts. “David of the White Rock (Dafydd y Garreg Wen)” perhaps the most challenging song on the album from a vocal perspective, and Sarah shows how much she has grown as a singer since we heard her on “Trail of Dreams”.

“She Moved Through the Fair” is always welcome in any context  – and 2002’s version is much less vulnerable than Loreena McKennitt’s, but it is really a bit too much to ask that a young singer like Sarah be able to communicate such a dramatic narrative.

Of all the fine lullabies on “Celtic Fairy Dream”, the song “Little Bird (Éiníní)” is the most sleep-inducing. It is like a sleeping pill, but much more effective.

The fairy theme aside, “Celtic Fairy Dream” is really a down-to-earth release with many classical inspirations that will give joy to new and old fans alike. It is a great installment in 2002’s Celtic Fairy series, and the songs “Castle of Dromore” and “The Green Fields of Autumn” have become New Age music hits over the last year. In short: “Celtic Fairy Dream” is a must in the difficult times ahead.

For more information and music samples, see 2002music.com